Launch of iPhone 3G (and the non-launch of MobileMe)

Wow. A historic day in the gadget world. The iPhone 3G is out (released in New Zealand a few hours back, comes out here in the morning), MobileMe was launched, and then disappeared (and remains unavailable), and the Apps Store went live.

The apps store (available in iTunes) has got some really sweet software. This iPhone is going to change the mobile scene Big Stylee. For the first time, virtually anyone can develop apps for mobiles and market them for next to nothing to a global user base. I don’t like mobile phones at all and haven’t upgraded mine in years …but the iphone is something else.

I mean, come on, how can you resist when you can use it as a remote control for your music library on your computer.

And what about this one: listening to a piece of music and want to know what it is? Let your phone listen to it for 5 seconds and it will tell you what the song is (and provide you with a link to buy it).

And then there’s Exposure: it’s Flickr in your pocket. But check this out – you can tap on a button and using the iPhone’s GPS and Flickrs metadata it will show you a bunch of photos taken near where you’re standing! (good for people who are so addicted to looking at their iPhone they miss the surrounding scenery.

Other apps I downloaded (despite not having an iPhone or iPod Touch) included Twitterific, a groovy calendar-converter for Japanese years, the evernote app and …Facebook. A totally pointless exercise, but they bring me closer to the iPhone (which I’ll pick up in September).

And that remote control app for iTunes. I know it is just silly to get so excited about turning your phone into a remote control, but I don’t know, there’s something about it that just gets me.

It seems Apple is experiencing major issues with MobileMe though. Let’s just hope they get it sorted soon though so I too can wake up to Exchange for the rest of us 🙂

Another step towards openness

Being an Apple fan boy, I am very excited about picking up my iPhone in September. I’ve been finding myself in various situations thinking, “ah, if only I had an iPhone now I could… I know it’s not for everyone, but for someone who rarely goes anywhere without a Macbook, well, an iPhone would mean freedom.

A lot of my work is macbook-based. Also, I use it to communicate with *Twinkle*, like a (large, somewhat inconvenient) mobile phone.

The combination of the iPhone and MobileMe (due to launch in 81 minutes) is very powerful. The idea that I can have access to ALL of my data (only excluding my 500 home videos) from anywhere really excites me. I get such a thrill when someone asks me a question and I’m able to find the information they need within seconds – that’s one reason why I love being *Twinkle*s secretary.

Anyway, thinking about the iPhone got me thinking about what email address I’ll use with it. I want something ‘permanent’, not some transitory address that I’d only be able to use with that one carrier in Japan (the same thinking is behind my decision to buy three phone numbers for life from Skype – one for UK callers, one for Japan-based callers and one for my US contacts). We’ve long been dependent upon these companies for our contact-identities, but technological developments and the relative generosity of companies like Google (in providing Google Apps) means that we can now use our own personally-selected identities with virtually any communications device.

So if I wasn’t going to be josephtame@softbank.ne.jp, what was I going to be?

Hmm, maybe I could take the next step with my ‘experiment’.

One part of my ‘life experiment’ was to start to be very open on my mumble about my thoughts and feelings. To not devalue or disregard my own ideas in the face of the opinions of others, to try and live in the flow.

The second stage of this process was to put a link to my blog in my email signature. However, I was still a bit uncomfortable with this and so I’d often delete the signature before sending, not wanting those people to know about it.

And I do continue to find myself reacting with discomfort when a colleague or friend tells me that they’ve read my blog …and I really don’t like to see TDM displayed on someone else’s monitor. But paradoxically, I also embrace those situations. It’s another opportunity to let go. I am Joseph. I do not have to be what others want me to be. If I act out of love for others and in harmony with my core values, it’s ok. I do not need their subjective approval. Their opinions are just their opinions. There is no hierarchy, we are all together in this grand adventure called life. We can learn from one another. Someone criticising me is doing me a great favour – they are providing me with a far greater opportunity to grow than someone agreeing wholeheartedly with what I’m saying.

So back to this email thing then.

How about I adopt one of my web-domains as my email server? That would mean that I would effectively be advertising my online presence to anyone and everyone I sent an email to. How would that feel? It would be like inviting strangers into my heart to have a look around. That feels kind of uncomfortable. Surely there’s a limit to how open one ‘should’ be.

I thought about this for a long time. It was a difficult decision to make. Changing my email address so that it pointed at thousands of pages of stuff about me would make for a big step out of my comfort zone, and one that runs counter to prevailing popular trends (in that most people are doing all they can to protect their privacy).

After a day or so I decided that yes, I will take this step. It is uncomfortable, but I feel it is the right thing to do. I’m not sure why, but I think I’ll find out in due course.

This documenting my life online has come to be a big part of me, and I feel I have been given some incredible opportunities as a direct result of it. It’s not always easy, and I have to try hard to ensure that it doesn’t impact upon those that I love who are not so enamoured by the idea of being so open with the world.

The transfer of just over 22,000 emails from my old email account to my new one took three days (via POP3). It’s all sorted, and my new iPhone email is all ready for it’s new sexy host come September.

(Emails sent to my old email address will continue to be delivered.)